A study reveals how common cold can “protect” you from “Covid”!

Covid


    High levels of T cells from common cold appear to reduce a person's likelihood of contracting COVID-19, according to a "significant finding" outlined in a new peer-reviewed study.


    The study, which was published by researchers at Imperial College London on Monday, is "the first evidence of the protective role of these T-cells", as it has been proven that their presence in high levels after colds can help protect against "Covid" infection.


    Professor Ajit Lalvani, lead author of the study, wrote: "Our study provides the clearest evidence to date that T-cells caused by cold coronaviruses play a protective role against SARS-CoV-2 infection". He said the cells "provide protection by attacking the proteins inside virus, rather than spiky protein on its surface."


    The study began in September 2020, at a time when most UK citizens did not have Covid, as they took blood samples from participants within six days of being exposed to the virus.  He explored the levels of T-cells from common cold that recognized Covid proteins.


    Levels of reactive T-cells in individuals who did not have COVID-19 were significantly higher than those in those who had contracted the virus, indicating that T-cells target endogenous proteins in COVID.


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    Researchers hope that the study will affect potential development of new vaccines for "Covid", as current vaccines do not stimulate an immune response to endogenous proteins.


    Professor Lalvani said: "New vaccines incorporating these conserved endogenous proteins will therefore trigger broad-based protective T-cell responses that should protect against current and future variants of SARS-CoV-2."


    Despite the "important discovery", Dr. Riya Kondo, the study's lead author, explained that current T-cells are "only one form of protection" and "no one should rely on this alone", noting that vaccination is the most effective method. To protect against Covid.

    

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